Before U Go…

The Wii U has one foot out the door (or one foot in the grave, for the more macabre among you.) Its central conceit, the second screen of the GamePad, turned out to be a one-trick pony; second-screen home console gaming certainly didn’t catch on as Nintendo hoped it would, which may be the understatement of forever. With the GamePad and also the Wiimote both soon to go the way of the dodo, there are some hardware-reliant gaming experiences that will very likely die with Wii U, never to be emulated elsewhere ever again… unless Nintendo someday releases a Wii U Classic Mini, which I will be all over and which I can confidently say wouldn’t be greeted with a fraction of the demand that greeted the NES Classic Mini.

Now: if you’re like me, you don’t hoard consoles. If I’m not going to use a console anymore, I prefer it not to collect dust on a shelf. I sold my Atari 2600 to my sister’s friend for a slice of pizza, and I left my PS1 in my college rec room; finders-keepers. So in my household, the Wii U is going, going, soon-to-be-gone, and as the Wii era draws to a close, I find myself indulging in games that, due in many instances to a reliance on Wii/Wii U hardware features, are likely not going to be playable anywhere else anytime soon. These are the games that, if it all possible, you should try and play before moving on to the Switch.

1.) The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword – Not exactly a low-profile title, Skyward Sword came at the end of the Wii’s life cycle and sold far fewer copies than one would expect of a Zelda game. There have been calls of late for Nintendo to deliver an HD port of Skyward Sword to the Switch, sans motion controls. I’m playing through Skyward Sword now and I’m here to tell you: that’s impossible. The entire game is designed around the Wii Motion Plus’s 1-to-1 motion controls, from interaction with keys, to swimming and flying around Hyrule, to combat with both dungeon masters and bokoblins alike. Remastering the game without motion controls would be like remastering Twilight Princess without the wolf sections: Nintendo may as well make a whole new game instead. The Switch’s Joy-Cons have motion control baked in, but are they capable of Wii Motion Plus-levels of movement mimicry? The Switch has no sensor bar; does that mean Wii-style gaming is impossible, or can the Joy-Con’s IR camera replicate the Wiimote/sensor bar relationship? Well, I’ll tell you: I don’t know. What I DO know is that Skyward Sword is the one 3D Zelda that may not be able to follow Nintendo consoles through iteration after iteration. If you haven’t played it, play it now, before you can’t.

2.) Star Fox GuardStar Fox Zero‘s awkward controls were the result of Nintendo tasking Shigeru Miyamoto with designing games to justify the GamePad’s existence, and that is a terrible place to begin designing art from. Zero‘s biggest problem was simple: you don’t take an arcade-style shooter and make controlling it MORE complicated, which is exactly what controlling your Arwing’s targeting reticle through the GamePad’s second screen did. Star Fox Zero, though, was just one of the games Miyamoto-san came up with for the GamePad. One of the others eventually became Star Fox Guard, a security-camera simulator that tasks the player with protecting a mining facility from attacking robots. On the TV are the feeds from the complex’s twelve security cameras: the large primary feed ringed by the other smaller feeds. On the GamePad screen is an overhead radar map of the facility, and the player uses this to control which camera’s feed is primary and to keep an eye on which class of robots are heading into the facility from which direction, as well as to reposition and refocus the cameras. It’s a multi-tasking action game that keeps the player swiveling their head from the camera feed to the radar map, but unlike many of Wii U’s split-focus games, it actually works. Star Fox Guard is well worth your time; it’s like Five Nights at Freddy’s, but with no cheap jump scares and with actual gameplay. If that doesn’t sell you on it, nothing will.

3.) Affordable Space Adventures – Along with ZombiU (now available on PS4 and XB1) and Super Mario Maker (now on 3DS), KnapNok’s blackly comic space exploration title, where the player steps into the shoes of an unseen tourist whose vacation has gone horribly awry, boasts some of the best usage of the Wii U’s GamePad to be implemented over the course of the console’s short life. Affordable Space Adventures sets the player off to explore a not-so-friendly (and not-as-advertised) alien landscape in a small, unarmed spacecraft that has, just before the start of the game, survived a crash landing. The GamePad plays the role of the craft’s engineering console, and as systems self-repair and come online, the player (or players; ASA supports up to three-player co-op) must manage engines and sensor arrays and other systems, powering them up and down as necessary to avoid confrontation for the alien inhabitants and weaponry that will destroy your craft in an instant should they detect its presence. It’s reminiscent of the old Rare designed NES game Solar Jetman (except ASA isn’t completely impossible) with the borrowed atmosphere of an HD side-scrolling Metroid… a beast that still inexplicably doesn’t exist. Affordable Space Adventures simply would not work on any other currently existing console, and it can be played over the course of two or three sessions. If you haven’t indulged yet, do so now or forever hold your peace.

4.) Splatoon‘s Single Player CampaignSplatoon‘s bread and butter is Turf War and its other multi-player arenas, and that’s an experience that’s going to transfer over to the Switch’s Splatoon 2. Splatoon 2 will also feature a single player campaign, but… if you’ve not played Splatoon‘s single player campaign, you should stop everything and do so now. Look: the campaign itself is a lot of fun. As others have said, it feels a little like a hybrid between Super Marios Galaxy and Sunshine. The reason that you simply must play through Splatoon‘s single player campaign before saying sayonara to Wii U is this: the final boss battle against the leader of the game’s enemy Octarians, DJ Octavio, is one of the best boss battles ever designed. It is lengthy and challenging but never feels impossible. It was one of the more satisfying boss-fighting experiences I’ve had in a very long time, and while a Switch port of Splatoon is more than possible (Splatoon 2‘s existence proves the franchise isn’t second-screen reliant), it’s not worth the risk. Go fight this fight before Wii U says goodbye for good.

So if you haven’t already, these are four of the Wii/Wii U titles you should play before you make the switch to Switch. Also: I’m already tired of Switch puns.

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